Greetings from another Planet – Mammoth Hot Springs

Mammoth Hot Springs – another crazy – colorful – diverse area of Yellowstone National Park.  The colors, shapes, textures can be found nowhere else – outside of a fairly active thermal area.

Mammouth Hot Springs

Mammoth is a large complex of hot springs on a hill of travertine in the Park adjacent to Fort Yellowstone and the Mammoth Hot Springs Historic District.

IMG_4057

It was created over thousands of years as hot water from the spring cooled and deposited calcium carbonate (over two tons flow into Mammoth each day in a solution). Although these springs lie outside the caldera boundary, their energy has been attributed to the same magmatic system that fuels other Yellowstone geothermal areas.

IMG_4003

The hot water that feeds Mammoth comes from Norris Geyser Basin after traveling underground via a fault line that runs through limestone and roughly parallel to the Norris-to-Mammoth road. The limestone from rock formations along the fault is the source of the calcium carbonate.[4] Shallow circulation along this corridor allows Norris’ superheated water to slightly cool before surfacing at Mammoth, generally at about 170 °F.

IMG_4089
Wonders of Mammoth

 

Algae living in the warm pools have tinted the travertine shades of brown, orange, red, and green.

IMG_4043

 

Thermal activity here is extensive both over time and distance. Terrace Mountain at Mammoth Hot Springs is the largest known carbonate-depositing spring in the world. The terraces in Mammoth have been deposited by the spring over many years but, due to recent minor earthquake activity, the spring vent has shifted, rendering the terraces dry.

 

IMG_4011
The Mammoth Terraces extend all the way from the hillside, across the Parade Ground, and down to Boiling River. The Mammoth Hotel, as well as all of Fort Yellowstone, is built upon an old terrace formation known as Hotel Terrace.

 

IMG_4053


Several thermal kames, including Capitol Hill and Dude Hill, are major features of the Mammoth Village area. Ice-marginal stream beds are in evidence in the small, narrow valleys where Floating Island Lake and Phantom Lake are found. In Gardner Canyon one can see the old, sorted gravel bed of the Gardner River.

 

Crazy colors of Mammoth


IMG_4093

IMG_4043

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_4090

 

IMG_4043

 

 

IMG_4081
Minerva

 

IMG_4079

Minerva Terrace, a series of travertine terraces. The terraces have been deposited by the spring over many years but, due to recent minor earthquake activity, the spring vent has shifted, rendering the terraces dry

 

 

 

IMG_4003

Mammoth is (many times) the first stop for tour bus visitors, making it crowded early in the morning.  We avoided that by taking a horseback ride at the Mammoth corrals (take a ride out of Canyon instead – a better ride) – later visit meant less crowds.  

 

IMG_4090

 

 

 

 

 






 

IMG_4012


One thought on “Greetings from another Planet – Mammoth Hot Springs

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s